Wheat Field

SELF-CARE

who sows, reaps

In a sense, and within a context that allows it, we are responsible for our well-being. Therefore, if we want to feel good, we can choose the option of taking care of ourselves both on the outside and inside.

Taking care of ourselves will have different nuances for each one and the activities we choose will be different when dedicating the time necessary to take care of ourselves. I encourage you to find the activities that make you feel good.

But yes, it is true that there are some common aspects that satisfy the common welfare and that have been investigated in different scientific studies.

GOOD REST

Sleep is restful and we need a good rest in order to function well.

When we sleep, the body relaxes and this facilitates the production of melanin and serotonin. These hormones counteract the effects of stress hormones (adrenaline and cortisol) and help us to be happier and emotionally stronger. Lack of sleep causes, on the contrary, an increased and sustained release of stress hormones.

EAT HEALTHY

Eating well reduces mood swings, increases productivity, and even some foods can help the body reduce the release of the stress hormone (cortisol). Also some specific foods can help you improve your mood.

You will feel more balanced, more energetic, more alert and fitter.

DO SPORTS

It doesn't matter which of them you choose. Each person is able to discover what physical activity makes them feel good and with which they can enjoy. There is no use exercising if you don't enjoy yourself during the process.

Exercise has many benefits: it produces one of the happiness hormones (dopamine), reduces stress, relieves anxiety, and prevents cognitive decline ...

MEDITATION

We are increasingly incorporating oriental practices in the West. Meditation is one of them and its benefits have been shown by different studies:

  • Levels of anxiety and depression go down.

  • Some areas of the brain associated with feelings of empathy, compassion and altruistic love are activated.

  • The amygdala, the region of the brain involved in the fear process, is reduced in volume.

  • Helps to achieve relaxation.

  • Improves emotional stability.

  • Improves attention and concentration.